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Posts Tagged ‘punishment’

The PGA tour sets to fine Tiger Woods for his comments about officials rushing Harrington’s play at the latest tournament.

The PGA wants to suppress this type of behavior:

Section VI-D in the PGA Tour’s player handbook says, “It is an obligation of membership to refrain from comments to the news media that unreasonably attack or disparage tournaments, sponsors, fellow members, players, or PGA Tour.”

The officials correctly put Woods and Harrington on the clock, they were way behind the other groups.  No issue there.  Woods complains, doesn’t exactly attack or disparage anyone.  Not really a big issue.  However, the PGA wants to make sure that the #1 golfer in the world (money, fame, skill) doesn’t get to bend the rules.  Again, not really an issue.  The issue is… you can’t punish Tiger Woods with a FINE.  He’s one of the richest guys on the planet.  The fine won’t bother him.  And, instead of punishing the bending of the “obligation of membership”, the PGA is likely reinforcing speaking out because the price is now set.  A fine. whoopee.  If speaking out gets a player a few extra minutes on the final day in the last holes, isn’t a fine worth it?  Speaking out against an official is pretty powerful and likely would cause an official to think twice before issuing the speed it up command.

What the PGA Tour should do is… nothing… and continue to speed up play.  Make sure that Tiger Woods is always running on time.  Review is last 50 tournaments to see whether he constantly lags.  You have to condition Tiger Woods and the others to speed up play.  the PGA Tour would then find, low and behold, they won’t complain publicly.  My suspicion is that Tiger Woods is usually slower than the normal pace and is usually allowed to take whatever pace he wants.  (I recall that there have been rumblings of his slow play before without official speed ups).  Thus, why would Tiger Woods respond well to a speed up request in this in-between-majors tournament?

We’ll see how this plays out.

For the record, I still think Harrington would have lost anyway.

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I wonder if I can break from the flow in this blog to posit a response on the CNN article

When any argument used results in the personification of the brain as an entity that ‘does’ things, the value of your verbal behavior to others gets minimalized. Brains are cellular matter that behave according to cellular chemistry and physics without any agency toward purpose, function, or order.”

Please don’t follow the crowd and use words as if they don’t matter. Furthermore, avoid the crowd’s focus on monocausality, absolutes and Newtonian cause and effect chain-link logic. You are involved with an organ that has roughly 100 billion neural cells with 10 million attachments to each one. Noodle that if you will! The number of permutations for what is going on in the brain as a billion fibers fire in and out of synchrony with other patterns is difficult to deal with. Using simplistic metaphors is what the crowd does. Metaphors may sound succinct but they reduce the reader’s ability to grasp the enormity of the problems involved in every aspect. Behavior::neural activity::genetics::the environment and their reciprocities are complex. The subject matter has a “wow” factor but it also has a history littered with charlatans, elixir salesman and worse. Don’t follow the crowd but instead, select the empirical path rather than the path of myth, magic and dualism.

No, these observations reported by CNN don’t abstract well.  They don’t do much but imply that a correlation is as good as a ‘cause.’ Pity. Correlations are the basis of fMRIs.

The brain doesn’t show that people fear being different. The brain shows patterns of firings that people with letters and research project numbers after their name interpret one way or another. You still have to listen and read and evaluate what they say, write and interpret.

  • How did the brain come to fire the way it did (in that area, at that amplitude, and pattern)?
  • What impact did neural plasticity have on the firings?
  • What do the fMRI readings represent?
  • Is the same firing pattern seen in Budapest or Pogo to that stimuli?
  • Is it true of Paraná tribe members and Malaysian sea nomads?

We are like others in groups or organizations because we are both reinforced and punished over time for our behavior in relation to their behavior. We recognize similarities (selectively) and as long as they don’t conflict with our other (selected) valued belief systems, we “relate” to that group. We diverge from social group convention for the same reasons. What is constant are the changes in the flow of what we value or what we relate to in those and other groups we attend to…which is also conditioned.

To show the degree that things are controlled by consequences, invite a Shiite to speak at your church mission group or invite a goyim to participate in the next Hasidic  law review. Watch the group behavior.  Of course these are extremes to show an effect.  But there are subtle abstractions as well… Bring your close friends, the ones who love you for who you are… to a Monster Truck Rally.   Social contingencies are powerful!  

That is one way to explain why some people are Green Bay Packer fans and some are Oakland Raider fans. Each sees things they value in their group and don’t value in the other’s group. Those ‘things’ are also conditioned by the contingencies the different fans were exposed to in the past.

How else does one explain being a Raider fan?

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